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MOUNDVIEW NEWS

February is American Heart Month! 

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.  Take care of your heart.  Prevention is the key to avoiding heart disease.  The American Heart Association's "Life Simple 7" Steps may help you improve your heart health.  Even modest changes can make a difference.  Start with one or two. The seven steps are:

1) Get active

2) Control cholesterol

3) Eat better

4) Manage blood pressure

5) Lose weight

6) Reduce blood sugar

7) Stop smoking

Call Moundview's Family Clinic in Friendship or Westfield today to schedule a checkup, including health screenings, to learn if you are at risk for heart disease.

For more information and heart healthy tips, please visit the links below:

Heart Attack Symptoms

Ten Things You Can Do For Your Heart Right Now

Your Heart and Sleep

Healthy Recipes

Heart Healthy Foods Shopping List

Keep Your Heart Healthy - US Dept. of Health & Human Services

Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics is pleased to welcome Beata Bednarska, MD, family medicine, and Heather Greiling, APNP, family nurse practitioner.  Both providers are now accepting patients at Moundview’s Family Clinic in Friendship.   

Dr. Bednarska is board certified in family medicine and provides care for individuals as well as entire families.  She welcomes patients age five and older.  Her special interests include women’s health, preventive care and weight loss.  She received her medical degree from the University of Warsaw in Poland and completed her residency at St. Elizabeth Community Hospital in Chicago, IL.  Prior to joining Moundview, she practiced family medicine at a private clinic in Chicago for 20 years.  

“I believe it’s important to treat the patient’s soul as well as their body,” said Dr. Bednarska.  “I take time to listen to my patients.  The more I know about their lifestyles, family history and social issues, the better medical care I am able to provide.” 

Dr. Bednarska is a native of rural Poland.  She currently resides in Arkdale. She has a daughter and granddaughter who live in Chicago.  Her mother, sister and extended family live in Poland. In her spare time she enjoys hiking, tennis, classical music and gardening.

“I feel comfortable in Adams County because it is similar to where I grew up,” said Dr. Bednarska.  “I look forward to establishing good relationships in the community and with my patients.  Medicine has been my passion since I was five years old.”  

Heather Greiling, family nurse practitioner, is a familiar face at Moundview.  She was a full-time registered nurse in the hospital’s emergency department for seven years.  While working, she went back to school for her master’s degree as a nurse practitioner at Walden University.  As a student she completed one of her clinical rotations in Moundview’s Family Clinic under the supervision of Sheryl Obernberger, nurse practitioner.   After receiving her master’s degree from Walden University in 2015, Greiling worked as a nurse practitioner at Employer Solutions in Stevens Point, providing primary care and occupational medicine. She also continued to work as a casual nurse in Moundview’s emergency room.    

Greiling provides care to patients of all ages, from infants to older adults.  Her special interests include asthma and other lung issues, pediatrics, health promotion and disease prevention.  She is also certified to perform DOT physicals. 

“My goal is to treat patients the way I would want to be treated,” said Greiling.  “People know their bodies better than I do.  If patients tell me something is wrong, I will work with them until we can determine what the problem is or refer them to a specialist as appropriate.”

Greiling grew up in Wautoma.  She currently lives in Big Flats with her fiancé, Corey, son and daughter.  Their children are active in Adams-Friendship Middle School athletics.  In her spare time, Greiling enjoys hunting, fishing and spending time with her family including her stepdaughter and grandson who live in Green Bay.  She also loves animals and has several household pets.

“I am happy to be working full-time again at Moundview,” said Greiling.  “I look forward to helping improve the health of local residents.” 

To make an appointment with Dr. Bednarska or Heather Greiling, family nurse practitioner, call Moundview’s Family Clinic in Friendship at (608) 339-6350.

 

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Beata Bednarska, MD

 

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Heather Greiling, Family Nurse Practitioner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics’ Association members overwhelmingly approved moving forward with a partnership (affiliation) with Gundersen Health System at the hospital’s Annual Association Meeting on Monday, Oct. 17.  Gundersen's board will meet in October to approve the partnership followed by regulatory filings.  The partnership is anticipated to effective January 1, 2017. 

Gundersen was Moundview's top choice as a partner for many reasons, including their commitment to providing high quality local medical care, financial strength, familiarity with critical access hospitals, clinical expertise and experience developing new services in the communities they serve.  Partnering with Gundersen will enhance medical services in Adams-Friendship and the surrounding area.

Moundview will, for the most part, maintain its legal structure, facility identity and community representation on Moundview’s Board of Directors. The transition would largely be seamless, as patients would maintain access to their current providers, Moundview would continue to accept the same insurance carriers and staffing and management would continue without significant changes in employment levels.  Moundview's name will change to Moundview Gundersen Hospital and Clinics.

“Joining Gundersen is a tremendous opportunity for Moundview and our community,” stated Don Heinz, Moundview CEO. “Gundersen is a strong, progressive, nationally recognized organization that understands the needs of rural hospitals. Partnering will enhance our services and the ability to compete in a continuously evolving and turbulent healthcare environment.”

About Moundview
Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics is a 25-bed critical access hospital with clinics located in Friendship and Westfield. The facility has been providing medical care in Adams-Friendship and the surrounding area for 57 years.

About Gundersen
Gundersen Health System is a La Crosse-based healthcare network that includes a large multi-specialty group medical practice, a teaching hospital, regional community clinics, four critical access hospitals, an inpatient behavioral health hospital, vision centers, pharmacies, and air and ground ambulances. Gundersen’s 7,000+ employees serve patients in 19 counties in western Wisconsin, northeast Iowa and southeast Minnesota. 

Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics’ Board of Directors will seek approval for a formal partnership with Gundersen Health System at the hospital’s Annual Association Meeting on Monday, Oct. 17. If approved, the partnership will enhance medical services in Adams-Friendship and the surrounding area.

“Moundview is a high quality, financially stable organization that enjoys considerable market share and community support,” said Don Heinz, chief executive officer, Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics. “Despite this, the complexity of today’s healthcare environment has made it increasingly difficult for small hospitals, like Moundview, to remain independent.” 

“In 2012 the Hospital Board began examining the steps Moundview needed to take to remain viable in the future,” explained Mary Polivka, president, Moundview Board of Directors. “A sustainability committee was established in 2013, including hospital board and community members appointed by Moundview’s Association, to carefully examine potential affiliation partners. Gundersen was our top choice for many reasons, including their commitment to providing high quality local medical care, financial strength, familiarity with critical access hospitals, clinical expertise and experience developing new services in the communities they serve.”

Heinz noted if the partnership occurs, Moundview would, for the most part, maintain its legal structure, facility identity and community representation on Moundview’s Board of Directors. The transition would largely be seamless, as patients would maintain access to their current providers, Moundview would continue to accept the same insurance carriers and staffing and management would continue without significant changes in employment levels.  

“Joining Gundersen would be a tremendous opportunity for Moundview and our community,” Heinz stated. “Gundersen is a strong, progressive, nationally recognized organization that understands the needs of rural hospitals. Partnering would enhance our services and the ability to compete in a continuously evolving and turbulent healthcare environment.”

“We are excited about the possibility of Moundview joining our system,” says Bryan Erdmann, Gundersen Health System vice president, clinical operations and regional system. “We’ve been impressed with the vision of the sustainability committee, the staff, the physical facility and the communities they serve. We look forward to building on Moundview’s 57 years of healthcare delivery in Adams-Friendship and the surrounding area.” 

Moundview and Gundersen are in the process of finalizing details and documents that specify the proposed partnership structure, duties and responsibilities of both parties. Moundview will schedule community informational meetings about the proposed partnership in the near future. Approval will then be sought from Moundview’s Association and Gundersen’s Board of Trustees. Should the process move forward as planned now, the official partnership would become effective at the beginning of 2017.

If the partnership is approved, Moundview will become the fifth critical access hospital to join Gundersen. The others are Gundersen Boscobel Hospital and Clinics (Boscobel, Wis.), Gundersen St. Joseph’s Hospital and Clinics (Hillsboro, Wis.), Gundersen Tri-County Hospital and Clinics (Whitehall, Wis.), and Gundersen Palmer Lutheran Hospital and Clinics (West Union, Iowa).

About Moundview
Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics is a 25-bed critical access hospital with clinics located in Friendship and Westfield. The facility has been providing medical care in Adams-Friendship and the surrounding area for 57 years.

About Gundersen
Gundersen Health System is a La Crosse-based healthcare network that includes a large multi-specialty group medical practice, a teaching hospital, regional community clinics, four critical access hospitals, an inpatient behavioral health hospital, vision centers, pharmacies, and air and ground ambulances. Gundersen’s 7,000+ employees serve patients in 19 counties in western Wisconsin, northeast Iowa and southeast Minnesota. 

Tele-Stroke Services

Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics has been recognized by the Wisconsin Department of Health Service's Coverdell Stroke Program for becoming a Stroke Champion in the effort to improve stroke care.   

“Our goal is to provide the highest standard of stroke care for our patients,” said Don Heinz, Moundview CEO.  “Our emergency department offers a number of quality initiatives that enhance the prompt diagnosis and treatment of stroke.”

“Participating in the Coverdell Stroke Program assists us in our quality improvement goals,” said Lisa Massen, RN, Moundview Emergency Department Manager.  “We collect and monitor stroke performance data, comparing ourselves against other hospitals.  We also have access to numerous resources including increased educational opportunities for our emergency department staff and the local ambulance services.  Quality stroke care begins with the pre-hospital care provided by the EMS (emergency medical services).   We work closely with the EMS and strongly encourage patients to call 911 if they think they are having a stroke."

“Patients who arrive by ambulance have an advantage because they receive pre-hospital testing," said Charles Pratt, MD, Moundview Emergency Department Medical Director. "We are in constant communication with the EMS.  They relay patient assessments to our staff which results in faster treatment.  Once the patient arrives in the ER, they can be sent immediately to receive a CT scan of their head to give us a more clear diagnosis of their condition.” 

“We provide a clot busting drug to 100% of stroke patients who are within a three to four and a half hour window of symptom onset,” continued Dr. Pratt.  “We only have a small window of time to prevent severe disability or, in some cases, death.” 

Stroke care will be further enhanced this summer with the introduction of a new, state-of-the-art Tele-Stroke service at Moundview’s Emergency Department.  The service provides 24-hour diagnostic consultation with a neurologist via two-way video conferencing.

“Tele-Stroke will optimize stroke care for our patients,” said Heinz.  “Currently neurology consultations occur over the phone in our emergency room,” said Heinz.  “Tele-Stroke will enable our ER staff to initiate a “face-to-face” consultation with an off-site neurologist who will remotely examine the patient using a high resolution camera, computer, speakers, microphone and medical equipment.  The patient’s CT test results will be reviewed by the neurologist who will then make a diagnosis and recommend treatment.”

“In addition to prompt treatment, community education also plays an important role in stroke care,” said Massen.  “Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States.  We encourage everyone to learn the acronym F.A.S.T. to help spot a stroke which stands for facial droop, arm weakness, speech difficulty and time to call 911.” 

While time is of the essence when someone is having a stroke, prevention is the key to avoiding one in the first place.  Most strokes are preventable.  Some risk factors can’t be changed, such as heredity, age and race.  Other risk factors can be improved, treated or controlled including high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, poor diet, physical inactivity and obesity, high blood cholesterol, atrial fibrillation, carotid or other artery disease, peripheral artery disease, other heart disease and sickle cell disease.

To learn if you are at risk for a stroke, schedule a checkup with your health care provider or call Moundview’s Family Clinics in Friendship (608) 339-6350 or Westfield (608) 296-6350. 

 

 

 

Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinic’s Emergency Department recently passed a state survey to be certified as a Level Four Trauma Center.  The certification is effective for three years. 

“Achieving level four trauma certification means Moundview’s emergency room has demonstrated to state surveyors the ability to provide advanced trauma life support for injured patients,” said Don Heinz, Moundview CEO. “This includes evaluation, stabilization, treatment, diagnostics, and transfer of patients to a higher level trauma center when needed.” 

“A trauma is a serious injury to a person’s body which could be the result of a motor vehicle accident, fall, injury from a weapon, or many other circumstances,” said Lisa Massen, RN, Emergency Department Manager.  “This type of injury requires a higher level of care which our emergency room is able to provide.  We have an advanced trauma life support certified physician on staff 24-hours a day.  Our registered nurses are also trauma certified.  Our radiology and laboratory services are available within 15 minutes or less, orthopedic surgeries are available Monday-Friday, and we have transfer agreements with other hospitals when patients need higher levels of comprehensive care.”   

The state surveyors were impressed with Moundview’s trauma quality initiatives including the establishment of a hospital-wide trauma team, staff education, review of trauma cases by the ER medical director and manager, community education on injury prevention, and evaluation of Moundview’s patient care as compared to state standards on numerous quality improvement measures. 

“As a rural hospital, one of our most utilized services is the emergency room,” said Heinz.  “We see a large increase in trauma cases during the summer due to the influx of tourists and seasonal residents.  Local and seasonal residents alike can be confident that they will receive good care at Moundview.”

Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the third most common cancer found in men and women in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society.  When detected early, this cancer has a very high cure rate.  Colorectal cancer often has no symptoms.  Unfortunately, many adults avoid the screenings needed to detect this disease.  Your change of having colorectal cancer goes up after age 50.  More than nine out of ten people who have colorectal cancer are older than 50 according to the American Cancer Society. 

In addition to age, other risk factors include: a history of colon polyps, a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, and a history of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease).  Lifestyle factors that may contribute to an increased risk of colorectal cancer include: a low fiber/high fat diet, lack of exercise, overweight/obesity, tobacco use, and heavy use of alcohol.  

Screenings for colorectal cancer to detect growths and other abnormalities are available at Moundview.  The following tests are recommended starting at age 50:            

• Fecal Occult Blood Test: This test detects hidden blood in the feces with a take-home kit that you bring back to your physician.  A positive test result does not necessarily indicate that cancer is present.  Bleeding may be caused by other sources, such as hemorrhoids.  This is not a very accurate test, but it is inexpensive and readily accessible.  A positive test result requires additional work-up including a colonoscopy.    

• Barium Enema: During this screening, your colon is filled with liquid barium and x-rays are then taken of your entire colon.  Air may also be pumped into the colon to make small abnormalities more visible.  Positive tests should be followed up with a colonoscopy. 

• Colonoscopy: During this exam, the doctor looks at the internal walls of your colon using a “colonoscope”.  This is a small, flexible, hollow, lighted tube inserted through the rectum and it contains a video camera.  The colonoscope allows the doctor to view the entire colon on a TV screen.  In addition, the colonoscope can be used to remove small polyps and collect tissue samples for analysis.  Patients are given a light sedation to assure there is no discomfort during the procedure.

After age 50, a fecal occult blood test should be done annually.  You should have either a barium enema or a colonoscopy every 5-10 years depending on your family history.  Ask your primary care provider about scheduling these screenings.  Screenings are typically covered by insurance, but it is wise to check with your insurance company before scheduling an appointment.

If you are 50 or older, talk to your primary care provider about scheduling a colonoscopy or call Moundview to schedule the screening at (608) 339-8494.


Additonal information:

Colorectal Cancer Screenings & Questions

Although you may not think of a rural hospital as a teaching facility, Moundview Memorial Hospital & Clinics has served in that capacity for several decades.  Numerous students have completed job shadow experiences, nursing clinical rotations and internships at Moundview including registered nurses, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, laboratory technologists and most recently medical students. 

“Moundview has a long standing tradition as a teaching hospital,” said Don Heinz, CEO.  “There are students who completed job shadow and clinical experiences at Moundview 15-20 years ago who are now working at our facility.  We believe in empowering others through education whether it’s offering real world experience to future healthcare workers or providing tuition reimbursement to our current staff.”  

Ana David, Raquel Almeida and Taynara Alves, fifth year medical students from the Uni Evangelica Medical School in Brazil, are completing an eight week internal medicine job shadow experience at Moundview through the end of February.  The opportunity was coordinated by John David, MD, internist at Moundview’s Family Clinic, who has a professorship at Uni Evangelica as well as friends who are physicians in Brazil.

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Left to right: Raquel Almeida, Taynara Alves and Ana David, medical students from Brazil, are pictured with John David, MD, internist at Moundview's Family Clinic.  The students have been completing an eight week internal medicine job shadow experience at Moundview.   

“In June 2015 a delegation of university representatives from Brazil came to Moundview to explore the possibility of a learning opportunity for their students at a rural hospital," said Dr. David.  "They were very impressed with our facility and the community.  They sent two students to Moundview in September as test pilots and sent Ana, Raquel and Daynara this January.  Knowing the university trusts our medical staff to teach their students is a testament to the level of quality care available at Moundview.”

Observing medical care in a rural United States hospital has been an eye opening experience for the Brazil students.  Their university is located in Anapolis, an urban city of about 350,000 people. 

"You would never find a hospital like Moundview in a small city in Brazil,” said Taynara.  “The quality, technology and efficiency is better at Moundview than at most hospitals in our country.” 

“One of the biggest differences between hospitals in Brazil and the United States is the electronic health record,” said Raquel.  “Providers are able to access all of the patient’s medical records, even test results that were completed at another facility.  This improves patient care.”

“Patient care is more fragmented in Brazil,” added Ana.  “You see one physician for diabetes and another for cardiac care.  There is no

 communication between the patient’s physicians.  In the United States, patients have a bond with their primary care physician. They see their primary physician for most of their medical care and only see a specialist as needed.  Their physician knows their entire health history which is beneficial to the patient."

The students are enjoying their time at Moundview and in the community.  They have learned a lot about local culture and feel residents are polite and friendly.  They are enjoying the cold weather, snow and football, especially the Green Bay Packers.  The students will go home at the end of the month, but are all interested in returning to the United States in the future.

In addition to the Brazil students, Moundview has provided learning opportunities for many other health care students, including nurse practitioners.  Over the past year alone, four nurse practitioner students have completed clinical rotations at Moundview.   Sheryl Obernberger, a family nurse practitioner at Moundview’s Family Clinic, is the preceptor for the students.

"During their clinical rotations, nurse practitioner students provide direct patient care, review and enter notes in the patients' medical records and research information to diagnose and treat patients,” said Obernberger.  “As their preceptor, I observe or review the medical care they provide patients dependent on their level of experience.  I also consult with the students and evaluate their clinical competency.  Serving as their mentor requires me to keep up to date on new clinical research and procedures so that I am aware of the current best practice for family nurse practitioners.”

Sara May, a family nurse practitioner student at Walden University, is currently completing a clinical rotation at Moundview. 

“Moundview is a great learning opportunity for nurse practitioner students,” said May. “I will be completing my fourth clinical at Moundview.  In a rural clinic you have an opportunity to see many different types of illnesses and patient backgrounds which provides a variety of learning experiences.  Completing all of my clinicals at Moundview has also given me an opportunity to establish a rapport with patients and effectively learn the electronic health record system.”  

Moundview’s Physical Therapy Department hosts four interns each year from various colleges such as Carroll University, Western Tech, UW Madison and UW La Crosse. 

“Having interns in our department requires us to pay close attention to detail so that we do our best to teach the students,” said Kevin Beaver, physical medicine and rehabilitation manager at Moundview.  “It also provides us with opportunities to learn the latest techniques that universities are teaching students.  An added benefit is the ability to recruit new staff.  We hired two of our past interns including Christopher Bongen, physical therapy assistant and Colin Steiner, physical therapist.”

“I was able to experience many different types of physical therapy settings at Moundview since it is a rural facility,” said Jordan Olp, a Carroll University student who completed a therapy internship at the hospital in December.  “The therapists at Moundview are highly skilled.  They exposed me to a variety of cutting edge treatment techniques.”

“Moundview strives for excellence as a health system,” said Heinz.  “Providing educational opportunities to future healthcare workers enhances the quality of our services and personnel.  The students bring new ideas to Moundview and share their classroom knowledge regarding the latest treatments in the medical field.  It has been a mutually beneficial relationship for the students and our staff.”

 

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